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How to Help Older Adults Manage Dementia

By , 9:00 am on

Dementia could cause your senior loved one to experience many emotions, including fear, embarrassment, denial, and depression. However, as a family caregiver, there are a few things you can do to make his or her life a little less stressful. Here are some of the ways to help your loved one manage dementia. 

Accept Change 

It is not uncommon for seniors with dementia to cover up the difficulties they experience with completing daily tasks. They do this to protect themselves from embarrassment and to make it easier for their family caregivers. Some seniors with dementia are reluctant to ask for help. This could cause seniors to “fake it” during the early stages, but you will need to help your loved one learn to accept the changes he or she is experiencing. Accepting the disease can reduce stress and restore balance to his or her life. 

Caring for a senior loved one can be challenging for families who don’t have expertise or professional training in home care, but this challenge doesn’t have to be faced alone. Family caregivers can turn to Edmonton Home Care Assistance for the help they need. We provide high-quality live-in and respite care as well as comprehensive Alzheimer’s, dementia, stroke, and Parkinson’s care.

Learn to Adapt 

Teach your loved one how to adapt to his or her new reality. Make a list of daily tasks that are becoming difficult to complete. Encouraging your loved one to focus on easier ways to complete tasks could prevent him or her from becoming upset and agitated. For example, if your loved one has difficulty remembering to take medications but can make the bed without any issues, create medication reminders for him or her first. You also need to determine which daily tasks are important and which can be delegated to another person. 

Create a Daily Schedule 

Your loved one could become frustrated, confused, and agitated trying to figure out daily tasks. However, having a regular schedule limits mistakes and gives your loved one a better chance of accomplishing goals with little or no help from family caregivers. Regular routines are also easier for seniors with dementia to follow. 

Caring for a senior loved one can be rewarding, but it can also be overwhelming for family caregivers who have other responsibilities they need to focus on. For these families, the perfect solution is respite care. Edmonton families rely on our caregivers whenever they need time to rest, work, run errands, and even go on vacation.

Set Realistic Goals

Seniors with dementia are likely to become depressed when they cannot achieve certain goals within a specific amount of time. Keeping a positive outlook, eating healthy, following the doctor’s orders, and exercising can help your loved one slow the progression of dementia and remain independent for a little while longer. Setting realistic goals and expectations is the key. Remind your loved one that it is okay to ask for help and to set realistic expectations with respect to completing tasks and achieving personal goals. 

Find Sources of Strength

Your loved one may encounter many good days and bad days while living with dementia, but you should remind him or her that he or she is never alone. Encourage your loved one to use his or her sources of strength, including family, friends, dementia support groups, and healthcare professionals. Pets can also provide seniors with the support and companionship they need while living with this disease. Remind your loved one that these sources of strength are available to help during difficult days, regardless of the daily challenges and setbacks he or she encounters.

Performing daily tasks while simultaneously managing the symptoms of a serious illness can be challenging for seniors. The Edmonton live-in care experts at Home Care Assistance are available 24/7 to make sure your loved one has the care he or she needs to remain safe and comfortable while aging in place. If your elderly loved one needs assistance with daily tasks, call one of our professional Care Managers at (780) 490-7337 today.